RAD BioMed - The Blog
Softwheel
SoftWheel is an innovative young company at the cutting edge of technology aimed at reinventing the wheel.We develop innovative wheel-based suspension technologies and solutions for a wide range of markets. 
Reinventing the wheel was made possible through our novel Selective Suspension Technology that is the fruit of our most dear resource - the people behind the wheel.In 2012 we introduced our first product, the Acrobatô,  a revolutionary wheel that helps wheelchair users enjoy a more comfortable, bump-free ride without performance compromises. 
Our mission is to keep reinventing the wheel delivering groundbreaking products that will reshape the industry. We strives to build close partnerships with leading industry players including companies and organizations, to bring about significant changes to the lives of our riders.


A lot is happening at Softwheel these days;
news coverage, press releases, videos, and more, can be found on our linkedin page:


01:08
May. 8
2014
Softwheel

SoftWheel is an innovative young company at the cutting edge of technology aimed at reinventing the wheel.We develop innovative wheel-based suspension technologies and solutions for a wide range of markets. 
Reinventing the wheel was made possible through our novel Selective Suspension Technology that is the fruit of our most dear resource - the people behind the wheel.In 2012 we introduced our first product, the Acrobatô,  a revolutionary wheel that helps wheelchair users enjoy a more comfortable, bump-free ride without performance compromises. 
Our mission is to keep reinventing the wheel delivering groundbreaking products that will reshape the industry. We strives to build close partnerships with leading industry players including companies and organizations, to bring about significant changes to the lives of our riders.


A lot is happening at Softwheel these days;
news coverage, press releases, videos, and more, can be found on our linkedin page:

Softwheel`s LinkedIn Page
BELKIN

Keeping an Eye on Cooperation
Daria Lemann-Blumenthal, CEO, Belkin Laser
 

Fundamentally, thereís always a bit of a difference between a medical startup and the others. For one thing, thereís a base level of maturity when most of the founders are doctors. Secondly, we all know the outcome is better health for people, so itís easier to remember the context of what we are doing.

We are creating a laser glaucoma treatment that can be used by any medical professional and brings the time of glaucoma laser procedure down to a matter of seconds, and makes it accessible to people with challenging eye anatomy, such as Asian descent.

 

Obviously, it starts with the people. These were hand-picked by the founder, Prof. Michael Belkin, and he made sure they were people who would put their egos aside for the common cause. Another key is mutual respect. You hear that a lot, but what it really looks like in a meeting is that everyone listens fully to everyoneís ideas, and people give credit to one another. As I write this article, itís hard for me not to just list all the amazing people on the team, like Dr. Ziv Karni and Asaf Klein at Alma Lasers who react in real time and are highly professional, Dr. Modi Goldenfeld, a glaucoma specialist who has great hands, ideas, and lots of patience for me and for the patients, and of course David Zigdon and Dr. Sigal Kremer-Tal from RAD BioMed Accelerator. We are fortunate to be working with the Tel-Hashomer Eye department study coordinators, who are diligent, efficacious and respect both our study and patients.

 

Working in the RAD BioMed accelerator is a great benefit for our startup, where not only each person is highly professional, but the workplace feels like a family. Everyone just loves coming to work. The best thing about this multi-disciplinary environment is that everyone is appreciated for what they bring to the table, with giving room for creativity and working independently. Hardship and obstacles get their own respect, and we are comfortable to share and exchange ideas with other project leaders and the incubator team, as all face similar challenges. We have regular meetings to discuss the progress and evaluate it in respect to milestones, in a constructive and supportive manner. That kind of freedom allows everyone to produce their best work.

 

The one cardinal rule for a great work environment is that each person and idea deserves respect and attention. I have that rule in my home as well. That kind of environment means people are willing to share and put in their best effort. We allow for constructive criticism. We donít criticize the person, but we give new ideas and build upon their work and concept.

 

As I see it, the good energy every one of us brings along is essential to the success of our young company.


10:35
May. 4
2014
BELKIN

Keeping an Eye on Cooperation
Daria Lemann-Blumenthal, CEO, Belkin Laser
 

Fundamentally, thereís always a bit of a difference between a medical startup and the others. For one thing, thereís a base level of maturity when most of the founders are doctors. Secondly, we all know the outcome is better health for people, so itís easier to remember the context of what we are doing.

We are creating a laser glaucoma treatment that can be used by any medical professional and brings the time of glaucoma laser procedure down to a matter of seconds, and makes it accessible to people with challenging eye anatomy, such as Asian descent.

 

Obviously, it starts with the people. These were hand-picked by the founder, Prof. Michael Belkin, and he made sure they were people who would put their egos aside for the common cause. Another key is mutual respect. You hear that a lot, but what it really looks like in a meeting is that everyone listens fully to everyoneís ideas, and people give credit to one another. As I write this article, itís hard for me not to just list all the amazing people on the team, like Dr. Ziv Karni and Asaf Klein at Alma Lasers who react in real time and are highly professional, Dr. Modi Goldenfeld, a glaucoma specialist who has great hands, ideas, and lots of patience for me and for the patients, and of course David Zigdon and Dr. Sigal Kremer-Tal from RAD BioMed Accelerator. We are fortunate to be working with the Tel-Hashomer Eye department study coordinators, who are diligent, efficacious and respect both our study and patients.

 

Working in the RAD BioMed accelerator is a great benefit for our startup, where not only each person is highly professional, but the workplace feels like a family. Everyone just loves coming to work. The best thing about this multi-disciplinary environment is that everyone is appreciated for what they bring to the table, with giving room for creativity and working independently. Hardship and obstacles get their own respect, and we are comfortable to share and exchange ideas with other project leaders and the incubator team, as all face similar challenges. We have regular meetings to discuss the progress and evaluate it in respect to milestones, in a constructive and supportive manner. That kind of freedom allows everyone to produce their best work.

 

The one cardinal rule for a great work environment is that each person and idea deserves respect and attention. I have that rule in my home as well. That kind of environment means people are willing to share and put in their best effort. We allow for constructive criticism. We donít criticize the person, but we give new ideas and build upon their work and concept.

 

As I see it, the good energy every one of us brings along is essential to the success of our young company.

Stepwise
Stepping into Innovative Solutions
Zvica Goltzman, COO, Stepwise

At Stepwise, the starting point is that a solution will be found to almost anything. We are talking about making surgery faster and safer. As far as I am concerned, it doesnít matter how many times someone else has tried before; there is always a new approach to be taken.
 
The issues with stapling technology for surgery are well known. Many companies have continuously tried to improve the technology and have offered only incremental changes. I was assigned to look for a transformational approach, which was inspiring for me.
 
Since there is lot of experience in the field of stapler development, the natural thing to do was to bring in the people who had been involved in such endeavors and put them in one room. That means experts from various disciplines, such as mechanical engineering, biomedical engineering, surgery, and entrepreneurs. The discussion focused on the reasons why it was so challenging to develop a better surgical stapler, because I wanted to first spotlight the current unmet needs. Interestingly, each one could spot totally different reasons.
 
The first thing that happened is that each one saw a different piece of the problem from the others. In other words, each person thought that the other`s problem was easy to resolve, and perhaps even had an idea on how to do that.
 
The second thing that happened was that together, as a team, we carved out the technological limitations. We then figured what other solutions were found to similar problems in other disciplines.
 
Sometimes youíll hear entrepreneurs say you should not bring in people with past experience, because they are jaded and just tell you all the reasons this canít be done. I feel just the opposite, and you just have to be creative about it. You need to create an environment that is extremely respectful of new ideas. The discussion has to be challenging but also open and caring. People can solve any problem with enough determination and brainpower.
 
Within a few weeks we came up with some basic ideas. It was not a fast process; we had to go back and forth a number of times. Yet, it is precisely this collaborative spirit and teamwork that are the building blocks for creating value in a way that will improve patient care and we are eager to find ways to overcome the challenges ahead.

08:15
Apr. 28
2014
Stepwise

Stepping into Innovative Solutions
Zvica Goltzman, COO, Stepwise

At Stepwise, the starting point is that a solution will be found to almost anything. We are talking about making surgery faster and safer. As far as I am concerned, it doesnít matter how many times someone else has tried before; there is always a new approach to be taken.
 
The issues with stapling technology for surgery are well known. Many companies have continuously tried to improve the technology and have offered only incremental changes. I was assigned to look for a transformational approach, which was inspiring for me.
 
Since there is lot of experience in the field of stapler development, the natural thing to do was to bring in the people who had been involved in such endeavors and put them in one room. That means experts from various disciplines, such as mechanical engineering, biomedical engineering, surgery, and entrepreneurs. The discussion focused on the reasons why it was so challenging to develop a better surgical stapler, because I wanted to first spotlight the current unmet needs. Interestingly, each one could spot totally different reasons.
 
The first thing that happened is that each one saw a different piece of the problem from the others. In other words, each person thought that the other`s problem was easy to resolve, and perhaps even had an idea on how to do that.
 
The second thing that happened was that together, as a team, we carved out the technological limitations. We then figured what other solutions were found to similar problems in other disciplines.
 
Sometimes youíll hear entrepreneurs say you should not bring in people with past experience, because they are jaded and just tell you all the reasons this canít be done. I feel just the opposite, and you just have to be creative about it. You need to create an environment that is extremely respectful of new ideas. The discussion has to be challenging but also open and caring. People can solve any problem with enough determination and brainpower.
 
Within a few weeks we came up with some basic ideas. It was not a fast process; we had to go back and forth a number of times. Yet, it is precisely this collaborative spirit and teamwork that are the building blocks for creating value in a way that will improve patient care and we are eager to find ways to overcome the challenges ahead.